I know I’m probably over-reacting but

IMG_4693I was personally affronted that Pembrokeshire doesn’t feature in the index of this little book that I have bought for the Tegfan book shelves. The author is Jean-Pierre Mohen who has a doctorate in prehistory from the Sorbonne and has written extensively on the subject of Megaliths in Europe, the Bronze Age and Ancient Burial Sites yet is in need of a Tegfan holiday to appreciate the Pembrokeshire cromlechs.

In Dinas we also have standing stones. There is one in the field just behind the Mercury Garage and others on the mountain. To be honest, there are so many that I’m never quite sure if I’m admiring an old gate-post, a stone for sheep to scratch their itches on or the genuine pre-historic megalith of significance. An ordnance survey map will tell you, however.

This book ranges over much of the Atlantic edge of Europe and the commentary is beautifully illustrated with many photos. In addition to up-to-date scholarship we get reference to discredited theories on the purpose of these monuments and their significance to writers and artists such as Flaubert, Thomas Hardy, Henry Moore and Prosper Mérimée. All in all, apart from its one notable omission, it’s a fascinating if brief introduction to these ancient stone structures.

Alors, Monsieur Mohen, voilà nos dolmens. Venez les voir!

Photo credit Gareth Jones

Pentre Ifan. This ancient structure is about ten miles from Dinas. Go along the main road towards the turn off to Nevern and look for the signs. Photo credit Gareth Jones

A more modest example can be found on the edge of a small housing estate in Newport.

Then, not far away, across the Irish Sea there are the splendid dolmens of Ireland. Click here for some great photographs.

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About bookvolunteer

I'm passionate about books, about Oxfam and about making the world a better place. When I'm not filling the shelves in Oxfam Wilmslow, I might be found reading the books I've bought in the beautiful surroundings of North Pembrokeshire.
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